Troubleshooting and Maintaining Cisco IP Networks (TSHOOT 300-135)



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Troubleshooting and Maintaining Cisco IP Networks (TSHOOT 300-135)


About This Course

Troubleshooting and Maintaining Cisco IP Networks (TSHOOT) certification training is a comprehensive training designed to train you to perform and plan regular maintenance checks on complex enterprise switched and routed networks. The course trains you to use technology and best practices and systematic approach for performing network troubleshooting. You also learn to use Cisco IOS troubleshooting and other specialized tools like Netflow, Syslog and Cisco IOS (EEM) Embedded Event Manager to help in your troubleshooting endeavors.

Troubleshooting and Maintaining Cisco IP Networks (TSHOOT) training helps you learn about tools and techniques used by networking experts and engineers for troubleshooting and maintaining complex switched and routed networks. The certification also helps you learn troubleshoot network connectivity problems, IPv6 assignment and connectivity issues, BGP (Border Gateway Protocol) routing, OSPF (Open Shortest Path First), EIGRP (Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol) faults.

Furthermore, you learn to work through DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol) addressing problems, VLAN configuration and network security as well as other network issues. One of the core requisites of this certification course is the aptitude to explore and learn novel concepts whilst reinforcing your understanding through a broad range of well-integrated lab scenarios. With hands and on-lab training, the Troubleshooting and Maintaining Cisco IP Networks (TSHOOT) course takes you through various case studies helps you develop insightful troubleshooting expertise across diverse lab scenarios.


Who Should Attend This Course

Troubleshooting and Maintaining Cisco IP Networks (TSHOOT) is ideal for:

  • Professionals preparing for 300-135 TSHOOT exam
  • Network technicians and engineers
  • Systems and support engineers
  • Network analysts
  • Senior network admins
  • Anyone involved in the process of troubleshooting, identifying and implementing switched and routed enterprise networks.

Why This Course

Cisco is a global leader in networking. In fact, Cisco is the name behind the functioning of a vast number of service providers including federal agencies, corporations and educational organizations across the world. In fact, 85% of the Internet traffic of the world passes through Cisco systems, which increases the demand for Cisco certified personnel.

Further, the course lets you practice and learn techniques and tricks to troubleshoot and monitor switched and routed networks by providing you with extensive hands-on exercises. You explore a range of troubleshooting tools, procedures, approaches and methods. Most importantly, the hands-on lab exposure is designed to offer professionals with specific networking issues that arise in today’s switched and routed enterprise networks.

After completing the course successfully, you will learn to:

  • Troubleshoot procedures, approaches and methods
  • Execute recommended network maintenance
  • Use specialized as well as basic troubleshooting tools

Most importantly, you will learn to troubleshoot:

  • Redundant ISP or internet gateways that fail to offer backup
  • Redistribution, BGP, EIGRP and OSPF issues
  • GLBP, VRRP and HSRP issues
  • EtherChannel issues
  • Other problems including GRE, AAA, IP SLAs, default routes, DNS and NTP
  • Internal device connectivity issues
  • Network device connectivity issues

Course Objectives

Post successful completion of this course, you can:

  • Plan and devise commonly executed maintenance exercises in complex enterprise networks
  • Develop troubleshooting plan and process for identifying and resolving issues in complex networks
  • Select troubleshooting tools and approaches that suit your enterprise network the best
  • Practice and execute maintenance exercises in switching and routing -based enterprise environments and networks in secured infrastructure
  • Maintain and troubleshoot complex, integrated enterprise networks

Course Prerequisites

Skills and knowledge required to enroll for this course are as follows:

  • Implementing Cisco IP Switched Networks (SWITCH)
  • Implementing Cisco IP Routing (ROUTE)
  • In addition, one should have practical understanding and experience to install, operate and maintain Cisco switches and routers.

Course Benefits


After completing the course successfully, you will learn to:

  • Troubleshoot procedures, approaches and methods
  • Execute recommended network maintenance
  • Use specialized as well as basic troubleshooting tools

Most importantly, you will learn to troubleshoot:

  • Redundant ISP or internet gateways that fail to offer backup
  • Redistribution, BGP, EIGRP and OSPF issues
  • GLBP, VRRP and HSRP issues
  • EtherChannel issues
  • Other problems including GRE, AAA, IP SLAs, default routes, DNS and NTP
  • Internal device connectivity issues
  • Network device connectivity issues

Curriculum


Network Principles

CCNP Routing and Switching – Overview

This section gives the information about Troubleshooting and Maintaining Cisco IP Networks. It is one of three exams required to obtain the Cisco Certified Network Professional – Routing and Switching certification. It focuses on troubleshooting Layer 2 and Layer 3 devices, planning regular maintenance, and troubleshooting methodology in complex medium and large environments.

IOS Troubleshooting Tools

This section shows how to use different utilities to troubleshoot network communications. It shows how to use debug command to extract information out of a switch and the debug command to a specific piece of information. It also talks about how to use ping to test connectivity to the network and other nodes on the network.

Troubleshooting Methods

This section talks about using a systematic approach to addressing problems within a network by applying a troubleshooting methodology. It shows how to use the Open Systems Interconnect(OSI) and TCP/IP models as a guide to troubleshooting problems inside the network. It discusses how to maintain consistency through change documentation.

Set One

Troubleshooting Overview

This section explores granular segments focusing on specific troubleshooting scenarios.

Set 1 Issue 1

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #1` from set #1. The trouble ticket states that NYACCESS1 is unable to communicate to its configured gateway of 192.168.16.1.

Set 1 Issue 2

This section disscuses troubleshooting issue #2 from set #1. The trouble ticket states that HSRP Group 12 on NYCORE1 and NYCORE2 are both reporting as active, but NYCORE1 should be active for odd numbered VLANs (11,13,15) and NYCORE2 should be active for even numbered VLANs (10,12,14,16) and NYEDGE1 should be the last device to become active in this group.

Set 1 Issue 3

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #3 from set #1. The trouble ticket states that PLABCSCO01 is unable to communicate to 192.168.16.2 which is a standby HSRP router address.

Set 1 Issue 4

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #4 from set #1. The trouble ticket states that PLABCSCO01 is unable to communicate to 192.168.11.4 which is located on NYEDGE1.

Set 1 Issue 5

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #5 from set #1. The trouble ticket states that The route to network 10.6.1.1 is not in the routing table of any device. This route should originate from OSPF Area 61 which is connected to NYEDGE2.

Set 1 Issue 6

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #6 from set #1. The trouble ticket states that The WAN conection between NYEDGE1 and NYEDGE2 is not up. The physical interface is up, however the line protocol is down and the console shows that the interface is flapping.

Set 1 Issue 7

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #7` from set #1. The trouble ticket states that NYEDGE2 and NYCORE2 are not forming an OSPF adjacency.

Set 1 Issue 8

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #8` from set #1. The trouble ticket states that PLABCSCO01 is unable to communicate to 192.168.226.0. Routes exist to this subnet, but you are unable to communicate to it from PLABCSCO01 and you can from NYWAN1.

Set Two

Set 2 Issue 1

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #1 from set #2. The trouble ticket states that “PLABCSCO01 is unable to ping 192.168.16.3”.

Set 2 Issue 2

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #2` from set #2. The trouble ticket states that “VLANs are not being propagated to NYACCESS1 when you create them on NYCORE1 or NYCORE2”.

Set 2 Issue 3

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #3` from set #2. The trouble ticket states that “Unable to communicate from PLABCSCO01 to 192.168.11.4 (NYEDGE1)”.

Set 2 Issue 4

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #4 from set #2. The trouble ticket states that “From PLABCSCO01 you are unable to ping 172.16.16.2, a host on NYWAN1’s Gi0/1 interface”.

Set 2 Issue 5

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #5 from set #2. The trouble ticket states that “Time is not synchronised on NYCORE1, all the other devices show the same time, but this switch does not”.

Set 2 Issue 6

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #6 from set #2. The trouble ticket states that “You are unable to ping 172.14.0.2 from PLABCSCO01”.

Set 2 Issue 7

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #7 from set #2. The trouble ticket states that “You are unable to ping 100.10.10.10 which is a loopback interface on NYCORE1 from PLABCSCO01”.

Set Three

Set 3 Issue 1

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #1 from set #3. The trouble ticket states that “PLABCSCO01 is unable to ping its default gateway”.

Set 3 Issue 2

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #2 from set #3. The trouble ticket states that “You are unable to create VLANs on NYCORE1, you should be able to create VLANs on both NYCORE1 and NYCORE2”.

Set 3 Issue 3

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #3 from set #3. The trouble ticket states that “The etherchannel between NYCORE1 and NYCORE2 is not operating correctly as shown by the output of the following command: show interface port-channel 1 etherchannel”.

Set 3 Issue 4

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #4 from set #3. The trouble ticket states that “You are unable to communicate from PLABCSCO01 to 172.16.16.2”.

Set 3 Issue 5

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #5 from set #3. The trouble ticket states that “NYCORE1 is the active HSRP member for VLAN 14, this should be NYCORE2”.

Set 3 Issue 6

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #6 from set #3. The trouble ticket states that “The path from PLABCSCO01 to 192.168.100.1 is going via NYEDGE1 and not directly via NYEDGE2 from NYCORE2”.

Set 3 Issue 7

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #7 from set #3. The trouble ticket states that “You are unable to ping 10.61.1.1 from any device”.

Set Four

Set 4 Issue 1

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #1 from set #4. The trouble ticket states that “An error keeps appearing on the console of NYACCESS1 that needs resolving”.

Set 4 Issue 2

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #2 from set #4. The trouble ticket states that “PLABCSCO01 is unable to ping 192.168.16.2, and NYCORE1 is the active router for VLAN16, NYCORE2 should be the active router”.

Set 4 Issue 3

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #3 from set #4. The trouble ticket states that “An interface on NYCORE2 is showing an err-disable state, this needs to be resolved”.

Set 4 Issue 4

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #4 from set #4. The trouble ticket states that “All of the standby groups on NYEDGE1 are active, when these should be active on NYCORE1 and NYCORE2, NYEDGE1 is the last resort router”.

Set 4 Issue 5

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #5 from set #4. The trouble ticket states that “Another HSRP issue exists, this time between NYEDGE1 and NYEDGE2. It appears that both routers are active for group 100”.

Set 4 Issue 6

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #6 from set #4. The trouble ticket states that “NYEDGE1 and NYEDGE2 are not forming an OSPF adjacency between them”.

Set 4 Issue 7

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #7 from set #4. The trouble ticket states that “You are unable to ping 172.16.16.1 from PLABCSCO01”.

Set 4 Issue 8

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #8 from set #4. The trouble ticket states that “You are unable to ping 192.168.224.1 from PLABCSCO01”.

Set Five

Set 5 Issue 1

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #1 from set #5. The trouble ticket states that “You are unable to ping 192.168.224.1 which is in the WAN connected to NYWAN1 from NYWAN1 itself”.

Set 5 Issue 2

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #2 from set #5. The trouble ticket states that “VRRP on NYEDGE2 is in a backup state, this should be the master”.

Set 5 Issue 3

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #3 from set #5. The trouble ticket states that “The routes for the SVI’s on NYCORE2 are not being propagated to NYWAN1 resulting in a failure to be able to ping 192.168.224.1 on PLABCSCO01 as there is no return path for the remote end point in its routing table”.

Set 5 Issue 4

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #4 from set #5. The trouble ticket states that “You are unable to communicate to 10.1.1.1 from either PLABCSCO01 or NYCORE2”.

Set 5 Issue 5

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #5 from set #5. The trouble ticket states that “You are unable to ping 172.88.88.1 which is a loopback on NYWAN1 from PLABCSCO01”.

Set 5 Issue 6

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #6` from set #5. The trouble ticket states that “You are unable to ping from PLABCSCO01 to 150.100.50.1, also a loopback on NYWAN1”.

Set 5 Issue 7

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #7 from set #5. The trouble ticket states that “There are no routes for the connected interfaces on NYCORE1 across the network. Therefore we are unable to communicate to hosts on those VLAN’s, for example you are unable to ping 192.168.5.1 which is SVI 5 on NYCORE1 from PLABCSCO01”.

Set Six

Set 6 Issue 1

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #1 from set #6. The trouble ticket states that “The tunnel interface on NYEDGE2 is showing as down causing problems with routes being propagated throughout the network “.

Set 6 Issue 2

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #2 from set #6. The trouble ticket states that “The routes that are being propagated from NYCORE1 are appearing as both external and internal”.

Set 6 Issue 3

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #3 from set #6. The trouble ticket states that “Logs from NYCORE1 should be sent to the Syslog server on PLABCSCO01 (192.168.16.10). Currently there are no logs being sent”.

Set 6 Issue 4

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #4 from set #6. The trouble ticket states that “NYEDGE2 and NYCORE2 are using LLDP, not CDP to exchange information between each other, however for some reason we can’t see the capabilities of NYCORE2 when you look at the neighbors on NYEDGE2”.

Set 6 Issue 5

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #5 from set #6. The trouble ticket states that “BGP is not working between NYEDGE1 and the ISP router, we are receiving no routes”.

Set Seven

Set 7 Issue 1

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #1 from set #7. The trouble ticket states that “Packets from PLABCSCO01 are not reaching NYCORE1 SVI VLAN 16. For example pings are failing”.

Set 7 Issue 2

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #2 from set #7. The trouble ticket states that “You are unable to see the route for 192.168.16.0 on NYCORE2 but NYCORE1 can see the route for 192.168.17.0, i.e. NYCORE1 and NYCORE2 are exchanging routes across their layer 3 link”.

Set 7 Issue 3

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #3 from set #7. The trouble ticket states that “When you shutdown Fas1/0/22 on NYCORE1 you are unable to ping 192.168.16.1 from PLABCSCO01 (the default gateway). You want to ensure that you access to the default gateway has an alternative path in case the link between NYACCESS1 and NYCORE1 fails”.

Set 7 Issue 4

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #4 from set #7. The trouble ticket states that “You only see the BGP route for 22.33.44.0 in NYCORE2’s routing table, but the BGP table has a lot more routes”.

Set 7 Issue 5

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #5 from set #7. The trouble ticket states that “The network 219.253.183.192/26 is not being propagated from NYEDGE1 to NYCORE2”.

Set 7 Issue 6

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #6 from set #7. The trouble ticket states that “The loopback interface 20 on NYEDGE1 is not being propagated through to NYCORE2”

Set 7 Bonus

This section discusses Issue #4 to solve the issue of establishing reachability.

Set Eight

Set 8 Issue 1

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #1 from set #8. The trouble ticket states that “PLABCSCO01 is unable to ping its default gateway at 192.168.16.1 “.

Set 8 Issue 2

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #2 from set #8. The trouble ticket states that “NYEDGE2 and NYCORE2 are not establishing a neighbor relationship in OSPF”.

Set 8 Issue 3

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #3 from set #8. The trouble ticket states that “NYWAN1 and NYEDGE2 are configured for iBGP but they are not establishing a connection “.

Set 8 Issue 4

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #4 from set #8. The trouble ticket states that “NYCORE2 and NYEDGE2 are configured for iBGP but they are not establishing a connection”.

Set 8 Issue 5

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #5 from set #8. The trouble ticket states that “NYCORE1 and NYEDGE2 are configured for iBGP but they are also not establishing a relationship “.

Set Nine

Set 9 Issue 1

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #1 from set #9. The trouble ticket states that “The port channel between the two core switches is not showing as up. This port-channel is configured as a layer 3 link between the two switches”.

Set 9 Issue 2

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #2 from set #9. The trouble ticket states that “Once the port-channel is up, OSPF is not establishing a relationship across the port-channel”.

Set 9 Issue 3

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #3 from set #9. The trouble ticket states that “NYEDGE1 and NYEDGE2 are unable to communicate to each other. This can be seen when using ipv6 ping “.

Set 9 Issue 4

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #4 from set #9. The trouble ticket states that “NYEDGE1 and NYEDGE2 are not forming an OSPF neighbor adjacency even though they are on the same IPv6 subnet. We should see an adjacency on Gi0/0 “.

Set 9 Issue 5

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #5 from set #9. The trouble ticket states that “The route for NYWAN1’s lopback 6 interface is not being propagated throughout the network, but loopback 16 and 26 are “.

Set 9 Issue 6

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #6 from set #9. The trouble ticket states that “You are unable to ping loopback 6 on NYWAN1 from NYEDGE2, you can ping the other two loopback interfaces, but not this one “.

Set Ten

Set 10 Issue 1

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #1 from set #10. The trouble ticket states that “EIGRP is not forming a relationship across the WAN link between NYEDGE2 and NYWAN1 “.

Set 10 Issue 2

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #2 from set #10. The trouble ticket states that “Whilst it’s not causing a problem, there is a configuration error on NYEDGE1 which may be confusing to an engineer if they view the configuration of the interfaces on NYEDGE1”.

Set 10 Issue 3

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #3 from set #10. The trouble ticket states that “IPv6 network on NYWAN1, Loopback 6 is not being propagated to NYEDGE1 and NYEDGE2 routers “.

Set 10 Issue 4

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #4 from set #10. The trouble ticket states that “You are unable to ping 192.168.32.5 (NYCORE2) from 192.168.16.5 (NYCORE1), yet you can ping 192.168.32.1”.

Set 10 Issue 5

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #5 from set #10. The trouble ticket states that “You are unable to ping 192.168.5.1 or 192.168.6.1 from NYCORE1 “.

Set Eleven

Set 11 Issue 1

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #1 from set #11. The trouble ticket states that “Routes between NYCORE1 and NYCORE2 are not being exchanged in EIGRP. You should see one EIGRP route in the routing table on NYCORE2 “.

Set 11 Issue 2

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #2 from set #11. The trouble ticket states that “BGP (IPv6) is not establishing a connection between NYEDGE1 and NYEDGE2 “.

Set 11 Issue 3

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #3 from set #11. The trouble ticket states that “BGP between NYWAN1 and NYEDGE1 is not getting established”.

Set 11 Issue 4

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #4 from set #11. The trouble ticket states that “When you observe the BGP table (IPv6) on NYWAN1 once the connection is up, you notice there is a rib failure for the network that is present there “.

Set 11 Issue 5

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #5 from set #11. The trouble ticket states that “There is no IPv4 route to NYWAN1 from NYCORE2, you are unable to ping to 192.168.5.1 but you can ping 192.168.5.2 “.

Set 11 Issue 6

This section discusses troubleshooting issue #6 from set #11. The trouble ticket states that “NYWAN1 and NYEDGE2 are not forming an EIGRP relationship”.

Schedule & Fees


SELF PACED Online INSTRUCTOR LED CLASSROOM
Duration 1 Year Access
Course Material
Exam Voucher
Face Time With Instructor
Course Price $299 On Request On Request
Enroll Now Enquire Now Enquire Now

Course FAQ


Why Tech-Act for Troubleshooting and Maintaining Cisco IP Networks (TSHOOT)?

Tech-Act ensures to recruit the best-in-class and experienced crew of trainers for all its courses to provide top-notch learning experience. Tech-Act is an authorized learning partner for CompTIA, EC Council and Pearson Vue. Most importantly, you get to choose the pace of your training.

What are the key benefits of Troubleshooting and Maintaining Cisco IP Networks (TSHOOT)?

After completing the course successfully, you will learn to:

  • Troubleshoot procedures, approaches and methods
  • Execute recommended network maintenance
  • Use specialized as well as basic troubleshooting tools

Most importantly, you will learn to troubleshoot:

  • Redundant ISP or internet gateways that fail to offer backup
  • Redistribution, BGP, EIGRP and OSPF issues
  • GLBP, VRRP and HSRP issues
  • EtherChannel issues
  • Other problems including GRE, AAA, IP SLAs, default routes, DNS and NTP
  • Internal device connectivity issues
  • Network device connectivity issues

Do you have certified trainers?

All our trainers are industry experienced and certified with extensive industry knowledge.

What is the eligibility criteria to enroll for Troubleshooting and Maintaining Cisco IP Networks (TSHOOT)?

Troubleshooting and Maintaining Cisco IP Networks (TSHOOT) is ideal for:

  • Professionals preparing for 300-135 TSHOOT exam
  • Network technicians and engineers
  • Systems and support engineers
  • Network analysts
  • Senior network admins
  • Anyone involved in the process of troubleshooting, identifying and implementing switched and routed enterprise networks.

Skills and knowledge required to enroll for this course are as follows:

  • Implementing Cisco IP Switched Networks (SWITCH)
  • Implementing Cisco IP Routing (ROUTE)
  • In addition, one should have practical understanding and experience to install, operate and maintain Cisco switches and routers.

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